The Collegiate Way: Residential Colleges & the Renewal of University Life  ‹collegiateway.org›

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St. Aidan’s College at the University of Durham

St. Aidan’s College at the University of Durham was established in 1961. It occupies a spacious site overlooking historic Durham city, and it is housed in a collection of purpose-built college buildings designed by Sir Basil Spence. These informal photos of the Durham residential colleges were taken by Robert J. O’Hara during a speaking visit to Durham. For more information about the residential colleges please visit the main Collegiate Way page.

[St. Aidan's College sign, University of Durham]

The road up to St. Aidan’s College on Windmill Hill, overlooking the city of Durham. The Lindisfarne Centre is the St. Aidan’s conference facility, a set of meeting rooms built into the college countyard.

[Porter's office and reception area at St. Aidan's College, Durham University]

The main reception desk at the entrance to St. Aidan’s College. Staffed 24 hours a day, this is a central point for arriving visitors and a source of information and personal contact for all college members. The notice board by the door carries timely announcements and nearly all resident students pass by it twice a day. The college offices for the principal, the senior tutor, and the bursar are just out of view to the left.

[Student directory board, St. Aidan's College, Durham]

St. Aidan’s College student directory, just inside the main college entrance and beside the Junior Common Room and dining hall. A posted directory of this kind is the next best thing to a printed college facebook.

[Courtyard of St. Aidan's College, University of Durham]

The St. Aidan’s College couryard, looking toward the college dining hall and Junior Common Room.

[Courtyard of St. Aidan's College, University of Durham]

The St. Aidan’s College courtyard and pond, seen from the main corridor beside the dining hall and the Junior Common Room. This view is in one of the highest traffic areas of the college, and the small artificial pond and its ducks provide endless visual variety.

[Dining hall of St. Aidan's College, University of Durham]

The St. Aidan’s College dining hall, with Durham Cathedral visible in the distance out the windows to the right. The locked serving area is just out of view to the left.

[Dining hall of St. Aidan's College, University of Durham]

The St. Aidan’s College dining hall being used for a late-night music rehearsal. A well designed residential college dining hall should be able to serve not only for eating, but also for concerts, plays, and performances of all kinds as well.

[Library of St. Aidan's College, University of Durham]

The St. Aidan’s College library. A set of lockable book stacks, just out of view to the right, are opened when a librarian is on duty and closed after hours. This permits the reading room to be open 24 hours a day for studying and computer access.

[Library of St. Aidan's College, University of Durham]

The St. Aidan’s College library, looking northeast. The tower of Durham Cathedral is visible in the distance on the horizon.


© Robert J. O’Hara 2000–2016